100-Year Flood – It’s All About Chance

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) | April 15th, 2010

Summary

1969 Floods

Santa Barbara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (SBCFCWCD) | May 9th, 1969

Summary

1995 Floods

Santa Barbara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (SBCFCWCD) | December 31st, 1995

Summary

1998 Flood Report

Santa Barbara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (SBCFCWCD) | December 31st, 1998

Summary

2017 Flood System Status Report

California Department of Water Resources (DWR) | August 10th, 2017

Summary

This report is intended to assist flood management planners and engineers in characterizing facilities within the State Plan of Flood Control (SPFC) and to inform the 201

A Climatology of Narrow Cold-Frontal Rainbands in Southern California

American Geophysical Union (AGU) | January 27th, 2022

Summary

Narrow cold-frontal rainbands produce short-duration (<1-hr), high-intensity precipitation associated with flash floods and debris flows in Southern California, inclu

A Guide to Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM) Delineation for Non-Perennial Streams in the Western Mountains, Valleys, and Coast Region of the United States

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) | August 14th, 2014

Summary

Federal regulations define the ordinary high water mark (OHWM) as “that line on the shore established by the fluctuations of water and indicated by physical cha

A rationale for effective post-fire debris flow mitigation within forested terrain

Geoenvironmental Disasters, Springer | May 25th, 2018

Summary

Watersheds recently burned by wildfires are recognized as having an increased susceptibility to debris flow occurrence. The great majority occur within the first 2 years

A Review of the Hydrologic Response Mechanisms During Mountain Rain-on-Snow

Frontiers in Earth Science | April 26th, 2022

Summary

Mountain rain-on-snow (ROS) generates large flooding events worldwide. Climate warming will enhance the frequency, magnitude, and widespread nature of these events. Past

A shift from drought to extreme rainfall drives a stable landslide to catastrophic failure

Nature | February 7th, 2019

Summary

The addition of water on or below the earth’s surface generates changes in stress that can trigger both stable and unstable sliding of landslides and faults.

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