Document Details

Potential Impacts of Future Geological Storage of CO2 on the Groundwater Reservoirs in California’s Central Valley

Preston Jordan, Janice Gillespie, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, | May 1, 2013
Summary

This study assessed the history of oil production and pressure changes in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin in California’s Central Valley as a reverse analog for understanding the pressure response to potential geologic carbon sequestration.

Sequestration involves injecting carbon dioxide into permeable strata such as those that trap oil. This results in pressure increases in the existing fluid in the subsurface that can provide a motive force for brines at those depths to migrate into groundwater, affecting its quality. The pressure can also cause differential ground surface uplift that can affect surface water flow, particularly in engineered water conveyances such as canals.

The strata underlying the Central Valley have been assessed as having considerable capacity to store carbon dioxide, but the area also contains urban areas and extensive agriculture that rely on engineered surface water delivery systems and groundwater supplies. The Stevens Sand, Temblor Formation and Vedder Formation were identified as having the largest cumulative net production from typical geologic carbon sequestration depths.

Two oil pools were identified in each of these stratigraphic units for more detailed analysis, which included converting fluid level data to pressure at the pool scale. Data were collected that allowed an assessment of the hydraulic connectivity of each unit. The results indicated that the Vedder was hydraulically connected at the near basin scale, the Stevens was hydraulically connected at the pool scale and was disconnected between pools and the Temblor was disconnected within pools. Researchers used these results to analyze possible brine leakage driven by geologic carbon sequestration. They also reviewed over 200 articles on historic groundwater contamination. They concluded that no instance of contamination due to upward leakage of brine in the Central Valley was reported.

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This study assessed the history of oil production and pressure changes in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin in California’s Central Valley as a reverse analog for understanding the pressure response to potential geologic carbon sequestration.

Sequestration involves injecting carbon dioxide into permeable strata such as those that trap oil. This results in pressure increases in the existing fluid in the subsurface that can provide a motive force for brines at those depths to migrate into groundwater, affecting its quality. The pressure can also cause differential ground surface uplift that can affect surface water flow, particularly in engineered water conveyances such as canals.

The strata underlying the Central Valley have been assessed as having considerable capacity to store carbon dioxide, but the area also contains urban areas and extensive agriculture that rely on engineered surface water delivery systems and groundwater supplies. The Stevens Sand, Temblor Formation and Vedder Formation were identified as having the largest cumulative net production from typical geologic carbon sequestration depths.

Two oil pools were identified in each of these stratigraphic units for more detailed analysis, which included converting fluid level data to pressure at the pool scale. Data were collected that allowed an assessment of the hydraulic connectivity of each unit. The results indicated that the Vedder was hydraulically connected at the near basin scale, the Stevens was hydraulically connected at the pool scale and was disconnected between pools and the Temblor was disconnected within pools. Researchers used these results to analyze possible brine leakage driven by geologic carbon sequestration. They also reviewed over 200 articles on historic groundwater contamination. They concluded that no instance of contamination due to upward leakage of brine in the Central Valley was reported.

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Keywords:

climate change, groundwater contamination, Groundwater Exchange