Document Details

Where the Wild Things Aren’t: Making the Delta a Better Place for Native Species

Peter Moyle, William Bennett, John Durand, William Fleenor, Brian Gray, Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, Jeffrey Mount, | April 5, 2012
Summary

This report proposes a reconciliation approach for addressing 160 years of accumulated problems and for managing the Delta’s ecosystem in the future. Reconciliation ecology seeks to improve conditions for native species while recognizing that most ecosystems have been altered irrevocably by human use and will continue to be used to support human goals. Improving ecosystem conditions for native species must, therefore, happen in a context of continuing use of land and water by humans and continuing physical and biological change.

$0.00

Product Description

This report proposes a reconciliation approach for addressing 160 years of accumulated problems and for managing the Delta’s ecosystem in the future. Reconciliation ecology seeks to improve conditions for native species while recognizing that most ecosystems have been altered irrevocably by human use and will continue to be used to support human goals. Improving ecosystem conditions for native species must, therefore, happen in a context of continuing use of land and water by humans and continuing physical and biological change.

Add to Downloads

Become a member to access this feature

Get Document


R_612PMR

Keywords:

Delta ecology, ecosystem management, endangered species, planning and management, reconciliation ecology