Document Details

Primary Production in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: A Science Strategy to Quantify Change and Identify Future Potential

April Robinson, Amy Richey, James Cloern, Katharyn Boyer, Jon R. Burau, Elizabeth Canuel, John F. DeGeorge, Judith Z. Drexler, Emily R. Howe, Ronald T. Kneib, Anke Mueller–Solger, James L. Pinckney, Robert J. Naiman, David Schoellhamer, Charles “Si” Simenstad | May 20, 2019
Summary

Today’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an unusually low-productivity estuary. The constraints on primary production and the relative importance of different production sources to the food web are major ecological uncertainties in the Delta system. Understanding how the extensive historical changes in the Delta landscape have altered primary production has the potential to inform restoration planning and management across the region. 

The Delta Landscapes Project (SFEI-ASC 2014) has recently produced information that allows us, for the first time, to answer questions about historical primary production and carrying capacity from quantified changes in the areal extent and spatial configuration of habitat types in the Delta since the mid-19th century. Our focus is on estimating primary production because the potential capacity of ecosystems to support fish, bird and other wildlife populations is set by primary production – the supply of food required to produce animal biomass. 

Product Description

Today’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an unusually low-productivity estuary. The constraints on primary production and the relative importance of different production sources to the food web are major ecological uncertainties in the Delta system. Understanding how the extensive historical changes in the Delta landscape have altered primary production has the potential to inform restoration planning and management across the region. 

The Delta Landscapes Project (SFEI-ASC 2014) has recently produced information that allows us, for the first time, to answer questions about historical primary production and carrying capacity from quantified changes in the areal extent and spatial configuration of habitat types in the Delta since the mid-19th century. Our focus is on estimating primary production because the potential capacity of ecosystems to support fish, bird and other wildlife populations is set by primary production – the supply of food required to produce animal biomass. 

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DPPW-Combined-Rev-2019_05_20

Keywords:

ecosystem restoration, habitat restoration, history, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, science management, water quality