Document Details

Human Use of Restored and Naturalized Delta Landscapes

Brett Milligan, Alejo Kraus-Polk | October 31, 2016
Summary

Current legislation and state plans for the California Delta call for large-scale restoration of aquatic and terrestrial habitats, which will require significant changes in land uses and cultural patterns to achieve. Yet landscapes that are restored for habitat for other-than human species will remain subject to human uses. This report looks at how human presence can and will continue after restoration, and considers how these uses can be best reconciled with cultural, ecological and adaptive management goals.

Our one year study builds off other research projects that have explored the California Delta from an integrative human-environment perspective. It uses a landscape planning approach that attempts to push beyond single sectoral methods, seeking a holistic integration of multiple goals and land use agendas spanning across ecological, social, economic and political domains.

This report’s findings are based on surveys, interviews, review of existing Delta planning literature, field work and specific landscape case studies. In general, our research supports the advancement of a reconciliation approach, which seeks synergies between ecosystem needs and the desires of those who live, work and play in the Delta, both now and in the future.

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Product Description

Current legislation and state plans for the California Delta call for large-scale restoration of aquatic and terrestrial habitats, which will require significant changes in land uses and cultural patterns to achieve. Yet landscapes that are restored for habitat for other-than human species will remain subject to human uses. This report looks at how human presence can and will continue after restoration, and considers how these uses can be best reconciled with cultural, ecological and adaptive management goals.

Our one year study builds off other research projects that have explored the California Delta from an integrative human-environment perspective. It uses a landscape planning approach that attempts to push beyond single sectoral methods, seeking a holistic integration of multiple goals and land use agendas spanning across ecological, social, economic and political domains.

This report’s findings are based on surveys, interviews, review of existing Delta planning literature, field work and specific landscape case studies. In general, our research supports the advancement of a reconciliation approach, which seeks synergies between ecosystem needs and the desires of those who live, work and play in the Delta, both now and in the future.

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Keywords:

ecosystem management, planning and management, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta