Document Details

Functional Flows in Modified Riverscapes: Hydrographs, Habitats and Opportunities

Sarah M. Yarnell, Geoffrey E. Petts, John C. Schmidt, Alison A. Whipple, Erin E. Beller, Clifford N. Dahm, Peter Goodwin, Joshua H. Viers, | August 5, 2015
Summary

Building on previous environmental flow discussions and a growing recognition that hydrogeomorphic processes are inherent in the ecological functionality and biodiversity of riverscapes, we propose a functional-flows approach to managing heavily modified rivers. The approach focuses on retaining specific process-based components of the hydrograph, or functional flows, rather than attempting to mimic the full natural flow regime.

Key functional components include wet-season initiation flows, peak magnitude flows, recession flows, dry-season low flows, and interannual variability.

We illustrate the importance of each key functional flow using examples from western US rivers with seasonably predictable flow regimes. To maximize the functionality of these flows, connectivity to morphologically diverse overbank areas must be enhanced in both space and time, and consideration must be given to the sediment-transport regime.

Finally, we provide guiding principles for developing functional flows or incorporating functional flows into existing environmental flow frameworks.

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Product Description

Building on previous environmental flow discussions and a growing recognition that hydrogeomorphic processes are inherent in the ecological functionality and biodiversity of riverscapes, we propose a functional-flows approach to managing heavily modified rivers. The approach focuses on retaining specific process-based components of the hydrograph, or functional flows, rather than attempting to mimic the full natural flow regime.

Key functional components include wet-season initiation flows, peak magnitude flows, recession flows, dry-season low flows, and interannual variability.

We illustrate the importance of each key functional flow using examples from western US rivers with seasonably predictable flow regimes. To maximize the functionality of these flows, connectivity to morphologically diverse overbank areas must be enhanced in both space and time, and consideration must be given to the sediment-transport regime.

Finally, we provide guiding principles for developing functional flows or incorporating functional flows into existing environmental flow frameworks.

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Keywords:

flows