Document Details

CVFPP Conservation Strategy Appendix J. Existing Conservation Objectives from Other Plans

California Department of Water Resources (DWR) | July 14, 2016
Summary

The Conservation Strategy, in conjunction with the Central Valley Flood Protection Plan (CVFPP), geographically overlaps with multiple regional and collaborative conservation plans that have been implemented or are planned for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. Regional planning efforts such as the Conservation Strategy are most effective when coordinated with similar programs and plans, in terms of both cost efficiency and ecological benefit. For example, knowledge gained through implementation of existing plans has refined the Conservation Strategy’s objectives and approaches. Additionally, during strategy implementation, collaboration with other planning efforts will provide greater opportunities for effective, integrated, landscape-level conservation. This could support achievement of individual plans’ important ecological objectives, such as improving habitat connectivity and increasing the size of habitat preserves. In other words, the collaborative approach will allow the Conservation Strategy to contribute to the shared objectives of the other plans while meeting its own objectives. 

The purpose of this appendix is to describe completed and ongoing planning efforts that have regional, geographically based, or quantifiable conservation measures that may be relevant to the Conservation Strategy. All of the plans and programs described overlap at least partially with the Systemwide Planning Area (SPA). The list presented herein is not comprehensive, but provides examples of efforts that were considered in developing the Conservation Strategy. In this appendix, completed planning efforts are summarized first, followed by those that are in progress. Potential relationships between these plans or programs and the Conservation Strategy are summarized in Table 1-1. Some programs, such as efforts to identify total maximum daily loads or implement Integrated Regional Water Management Plans, may support conservation work, but their objectives are dissimilar to those of the Conservation Strategy (i.e., focused on meeting water quality standards), so were not included. 

This appendix is not intended to present an analysis of each plan in detail. Rather, the intent is to identify areas of potential overlap between relevant plans and the Conservation Strategy. As the Conservation Strategy is implemented, potentially synergistic areas and areas of possible conflict between the Conservation Strategy and individual plans can continue to be identified. 

This appendix supports and recognizes considerations that will be essential as the Conservation Strategy is implemented. Specifically, this appendix: 

• efficiently uses current information to inform the Conservation Strategy regarding potential conservation goals;

    • recognizes that multiple conservation plans and collaborative planning efforts have been

completed, are in development, or are being implemented:

      • in whole or in part, the plans address many of the targeted species and habitats that occur in the SPA, and
      • the plans help identify conservation needs and priorities in the flood risk management system;
    • highlights potential conservation partnerships for the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) in implementing the Conservation Strategy, by:
      • describing opportunities to share costs on conservation projects and
      • describing opportunities for DWR to simultaneously meet its own conservation goals and contribute to plans or programs through specific projects; and
    • identifies completed conservation planning efforts, from which “lessons learned” can be applied to Conservation Strategy implementation

Product Description

The Conservation Strategy, in conjunction with the Central Valley Flood Protection Plan (CVFPP), geographically overlaps with multiple regional and collaborative conservation plans that have been implemented or are planned for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. Regional planning efforts such as the Conservation Strategy are most effective when coordinated with similar programs and plans, in terms of both cost efficiency and ecological benefit. For example, knowledge gained through implementation of existing plans has refined the Conservation Strategy’s objectives and approaches. Additionally, during strategy implementation, collaboration with other planning efforts will provide greater opportunities for effective, integrated, landscape-level conservation. This could support achievement of individual plans’ important ecological objectives, such as improving habitat connectivity and increasing the size of habitat preserves. In other words, the collaborative approach will allow the Conservation Strategy to contribute to the shared objectives of the other plans while meeting its own objectives. 

The purpose of this appendix is to describe completed and ongoing planning efforts that have regional, geographically based, or quantifiable conservation measures that may be relevant to the Conservation Strategy. All of the plans and programs described overlap at least partially with the Systemwide Planning Area (SPA). The list presented herein is not comprehensive, but provides examples of efforts that were considered in developing the Conservation Strategy. In this appendix, completed planning efforts are summarized first, followed by those that are in progress. Potential relationships between these plans or programs and the Conservation Strategy are summarized in Table 1-1. Some programs, such as efforts to identify total maximum daily loads or implement Integrated Regional Water Management Plans, may support conservation work, but their objectives are dissimilar to those of the Conservation Strategy (i.e., focused on meeting water quality standards), so were not included. 

This appendix is not intended to present an analysis of each plan in detail. Rather, the intent is to identify areas of potential overlap between relevant plans and the Conservation Strategy. As the Conservation Strategy is implemented, potentially synergistic areas and areas of possible conflict between the Conservation Strategy and individual plans can continue to be identified. 

This appendix supports and recognizes considerations that will be essential as the Conservation Strategy is implemented. Specifically, this appendix: 

• efficiently uses current information to inform the Conservation Strategy regarding potential conservation goals;

    • recognizes that multiple conservation plans and collaborative planning efforts have been

completed, are in development, or are being implemented:

      • in whole or in part, the plans address many of the targeted species and habitats that occur in the SPA, and
      • the plans help identify conservation needs and priorities in the flood risk management system;
    • highlights potential conservation partnerships for the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) in implementing the Conservation Strategy, by:
      • describing opportunities to share costs on conservation projects and
      • describing opportunities for DWR to simultaneously meet its own conservation goals and contribute to plans or programs through specific projects; and
    • identifies completed conservation planning efforts, from which “lessons learned” can be applied to Conservation Strategy implementation
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Appendix-J-Existing-Conservation-Objectives-from-Other-Plans

Keywords:

flood management, floodplain restoration, habitat restoration, planning and management, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta