Document Details

Wells of Southern California

Scientific American | March 22, 1902
Summary

In the Series of Water Supply Irrigation Papers, the United States Geological Survey has in press, but not yet published, the “Wells of Southern California” (Nos. 59 and 60), by Mr. Joseph Barlow Lippincott. In his letter of transmittal Mr. F.H. Newell, Hydrographer in Charge, remarks: “The results are instructive, as showing what may be done in other parts of the United States under favorable conditions of climate and soil, and have peculiar interest in any consideration of the extent to which the arid land can ultimately be redeemed by irrigation.” The region discussed is the San Bernardino Valley in Southern California, which has an area of 563 square miles, and lies south and west of the Sierra Madre and San Bernardino Mountains. Riverside and Rcdlands are the centers of fruit production. Up to elevations of 2,000 feet the relatively high lands are free from frost, and the relatively low lands are subject to it. The distinctive crop of San Barnardino

Valley is citrus fruits. Oranges predominate, followed next by lemons, and of late years the grape fruit has become a popular product. Olives, almonds, prunes, apricots, peaches, pears, and wine, raisin, and table grapes, are all grown to perfection in this district. In the eleven years prior to 1898 Riverside shipped nearly seven million boxes of oranges, an average annual income of $1,000,000.

Water is the lifeblood of the land.

Product Description

In the Series of Water Supply Irrigation Papers, the United States Geological Survey has in press, but not yet published, the “Wells of Southern California” (Nos. 59 and 60), by Mr. Joseph Barlow Lippincott. In his letter of transmittal Mr. F.H. Newell, Hydrographer in Charge, remarks: “The results are instructive, as showing what may be done in other parts of the United States under favorable conditions of climate and soil, and have peculiar interest in any consideration of the extent to which the arid land can ultimately be redeemed by irrigation.” The region discussed is the San Bernardino Valley in Southern California, which has an area of 563 square miles, and lies south and west of the Sierra Madre and San Bernardino Mountains. Riverside and Rcdlands are the centers of fruit production. Up to elevations of 2,000 feet the relatively high lands are free from frost, and the relatively low lands are subject to it. The distinctive crop of San Barnardino

Valley is citrus fruits. Oranges predominate, followed next by lemons, and of late years the grape fruit has become a popular product. Olives, almonds, prunes, apricots, peaches, pears, and wine, raisin, and table grapes, are all grown to perfection in this district. In the eleven years prior to 1898 Riverside shipped nearly seven million boxes of oranges, an average annual income of $1,000,000.

Water is the lifeblood of the land.

Bulk Download

Become a member to access this feature

Get Document


Wells-of-So-Cal-SA-supp-32202

Keywords:

agriculture, Groundwater Exchange, irrigation, water supply