Document Details

Santa Ana Canal

Joseph Barlow Lippincott | March 10, 1900
Summary

THE area discussed in this report is in Southern California, lying for the most part easterly from the city of San Bernardino and consisting of the upper or higher part of the valley in which is situated the town of Redlands. It is a bout 50 miles distant from the ocean and has an elevation of from 1,000 to 1, 500 feet in the vicinity of San Bernardino and Redlands. Northerly and easterly from the valley the mountains rise abruptly, reaching altitudes of fro m 6,000 to 7,000 feet, a few of the peaks rising to 10,000 or even 11,000 feet.

The abrupt slopes by which the valley is bounded aid in producing a rainfall relatively heavy for the arid region. The waters, uniting into streams, descend rapidly through narrow gorges, issuing finally upon accumulations of bowlders and smaller debris which stretch in fan-shaped masses away from the mouth of each canyon. The region, though dry, has thus a notable water supply and the exceptional climate and soil have resulted in an extraordinary development of agriculture by irrigation. Lands and crops have reached high values in San Bernardino Valley and expensive irrigation works have been built. A denser population is supported than in any other farming region of the West. This has been accomplished in spite of the fact that the cost of constructing works and of reclaiming the lands has been very great.

Additional resources on Lippincott:

J.B. Lippincott Papers, University of California, Riverside

The Santa Ana River: How it Shaped Orange County

Categories: , Tag:

Product Description

THE area discussed in this report is in Southern California, lying for the most part easterly from the city of San Bernardino and consisting of the upper or higher part of the valley in which is situated the town of Redlands. It is a bout 50 miles distant from the ocean and has an elevation of from 1,000 to 1, 500 feet in the vicinity of San Bernardino and Redlands. Northerly and easterly from the valley the mountains rise abruptly, reaching altitudes of fro m 6,000 to 7,000 feet, a few of the peaks rising to 10,000 or even 11,000 feet.

The abrupt slopes by which the valley is bounded aid in producing a rainfall relatively heavy for the arid region. The waters, uniting into streams, descend rapidly through narrow gorges, issuing finally upon accumulations of bowlders and smaller debris which stretch in fan-shaped masses away from the mouth of each canyon. The region, though dry, has thus a notable water supply and the exceptional climate and soil have resulted in an extraordinary development of agriculture by irrigation. Lands and crops have reached high values in San Bernardino Valley and expensive irrigation works have been built. A denser population is supported than in any other farming region of the West. This has been accomplished in spite of the fact that the cost of constructing works and of reclaiming the lands has been very great.

Additional resources on Lippincott:

J.B. Lippincott Papers, University of California, Riverside

The Santa Ana River: How it Shaped Orange County

Bulk Download

Become a member to access this feature

Get Document


Binder1

Keywords:

infrastructure, irrigation