Document Details

Planned operation of large-scale water-distribution system

Ali Diba, Peter W. F. Louie, Manouchehr Mahjoub, William W-G. Yeh | May 1, 1995
Summary

A water-supply-distribution-system planning model has been developed using a directed graph algorithm as its pre- and post-processors and a linear programming (LP) procedure as an “intelligent” system operator at its core. The directed graph, as a preprocessor, is used to produce a mathematical representation of the distribution system in question, to check the consistency and correctness of the network topology before an input file is created for the LP procedure. In the postprocessing mode, the directed graph generates files for graphical displays of model results and performs graph analyses such as depth- and breadth-first traversals, cut-set and connectivity for evaluating water-quality blending, tracking of source-to-demand contributions, system reliability, and lifeline objectives. Unlike the conventional formulation of a resource-allocation problem, the demand requirements, storage capacities, and other system constraints are removed from the constraint set and translated into a composite objective function. This methodology was successfully applied to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s (MWD’s) distribution system. The results indicate that the combination of using an LP procedure and graph algorithm is a very versatile tool for solving large-scale water-distribution problems. This paper documents the concept used in developing the system-planning model and the results of its application to a simplified example as well as application to four case studies involving the entire MWD’s distribution system.

Product Description

A water-supply-distribution-system planning model has been developed using a directed graph algorithm as its pre- and post-processors and a linear programming (LP) procedure as an “intelligent” system operator at its core. The directed graph, as a preprocessor, is used to produce a mathematical representation of the distribution system in question, to check the consistency and correctness of the network topology before an input file is created for the LP procedure. In the postprocessing mode, the directed graph generates files for graphical displays of model results and performs graph analyses such as depth- and breadth-first traversals, cut-set and connectivity for evaluating water-quality blending, tracking of source-to-demand contributions, system reliability, and lifeline objectives. Unlike the conventional formulation of a resource-allocation problem, the demand requirements, storage capacities, and other system constraints are removed from the constraint set and translated into a composite objective function. This methodology was successfully applied to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s (MWD’s) distribution system. The results indicate that the combination of using an LP procedure and graph algorithm is a very versatile tool for solving large-scale water-distribution problems. This paper documents the concept used in developing the system-planning model and the results of its application to a simplified example as well as application to four case studies involving the entire MWD’s distribution system.

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Diba-et-al-1995-SG

Keywords:

Integrated Regional Water Management, modeling, planning and management, water supply